Internet Overwhelm

Broken by Takahiro Kimura

I’ve been struggling with technology…for weeks.  Right now I’m in major overwhelm.  I get up in the morning, boggled with where to start, and then I read a timely blog from JANE FRIEDMAN asking why.   http://janefriedman.com/  Why are people of my generation so overwhelmed?  So here goes.

I’m 62, more techie than some my age, but still lacking in skills I need daily.  The problem is, I prefer to spend most of my time being creative (writing and art) rather than “learning the tools” to facilitate that creativity.

It’s also true with communications.  I love a good conversation.  However, having one on line can be difficult.  So many new skills and knowledge sets are required.  Unlike tools of my craft, technology keeps changing, getting more diverse, and more complicated (like viruses that are even attacking Mac’s.  OMG!).

I’ve had a blog for over a year, but after spending the weeks to design it and execute my design, I was worn out.  Regular Posts is a hurdle I’ve yet to conquer.  I returned to writing to take a break–which  adversely affects my newly acquired tech skills because when I don’t use the programs regularly, I forget how to.

To make it worse, when I do take the time away from writing to add to my knowledge base of Word Press, Facebook or Twitter, I find the “How To” manuals, blog instructions and videos incomplete, inadequate, or too complicated to understand.  In other words, it’s not well written.

I can stub my toe on a little thing, something I can’t figure out about a particular program or app, and it diverts me for hours and sometimes days, trying to find an answer–often to no avail.

The other problem is that there is just too much of everything on the internet–especially opinions.  I went to a Mac support group last night to get some help with GTD apps (I had to look it up to see that “getting things done” was exactly the help I needed) such as Evernote.

Everyone seemed to be eager to help, but in the end, I was just more confused.  They each had different recommendations, which leaves me with a “new” long list of apps to research to see if it will work for my needs.  I thought I had done that, but many of them pointed out problems and bad experiences with what I thought was a good choice.

After putting in hours researching and trying to learn the app with little to no success,  I’m back to square one.  To make it worse, I now mistrust my own judgement on “anything techie.”  And, messing with all this technology, I’m not writing.

Don’t get me wrong.  I love technology.

I wrote most of my book on the Ipad, using the Cloud to transfer it to my computer (and back and forth many times) for editing.  When it comes to research, Google is the best present I ever got!  Answers to all my silly questions with the touch of a few keys.  But can we trust the answers we get to the important questions?  I think we first must test it out for ourselves.  Again, everything takes time.  And that is the most precious commodity.

 

Despite the best intentions, technology created to make our lives simpler is at the same time making it more complicated. Dealing with the immense amount of new information poured into our daily lives is backing us against the wall.  How do we cope?

There is no simple answer–except maybe patience–giving it more time.  Not giving up.  And asking for help.

So, Jane, in response to your question, I give you one back.  Can you suggest an effective note-taking app for writers?

Also, is there an online community of tech help for writers (one where occasional answers can be answered for free?  And classes specifically for writer’s needs when we’re ready for more?

I know there are a million out there.  You’re the guru of giving writers information in bite (byte?) size bits so we can absorb it and integrate it into our lives.  If anyone can answer my question, you can.